35e FIFA: Festival International du Film sur l’Art

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Nick Cabelli for Cinetalk.net

This weekend marks the beginning of the 35th installment of Le FIFA in Montreal. Dedicated to showcasing short and long format films on art, the selections screening at multiple venues until the festival closes on 2 April presents an enormous selection of creative subjects, covered in creative ways and screened in creative spaces.

Le FIFA is a festival with so much going on that it would be impossible to watch every film. Their website breaks down the theme of film, while the print and electronic program is a wonderfully designed omnibus containing information on every film in competition and screening. Every festival goer’s FIFA will a be a different experience, and there in the multiplicity of experiences lies a powerful metaphor, where Continue reading

Life [US – 2o17]

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Nick Cabelli for Cinetalk.net

Life is an R-rated science fiction movie, with elements of action, horror and melodrama directed by Daniel Espinosa [who?] and starring Jake Gyllenhaal [Donny Darko, Nightcrawler], Rebecca Ferguson [The Girl on the Train, Mission:Impossible] and Ryan Reynolds [Deadpool, Van Wilder]. Written by the people behind Deadpool—a film whose success is the biggest reason why there are suddenly big budget R-rated genre films coming out of America—Life starts with a promising premise and timeless sci-fi trope, a crew of astronauts investigating alien life on the claustrophobic International Space Station. Life has a strong first act with tension, humour, visual spectacle, brooding doom and doom delivered. Unfortunately, Continue reading

P.S. Jerusalem (Israel 2015)

 

for Cinetalk.net

Because of the mysteries of film distribution, two years after its making, Danae Elon’s documentary, P.S. Jerusalem, is finally out today on Montreal’s screens.

After Partly Private (2009)and another Road Home (2003) Elon’s continues her work of auteur cinema in what is more of a private family journal than your traditional doc. With her three sons and husband being put to contribution as the main protagonists, we follow the filmmaker and her family while they settle in troubled Jerusalem, right after the death of Elon’s father, Amos Elon, a notorious Israeli writer who was highly critical of Israel’s politics. The confronting realities surrounding them in these trouble times raise endless questions and inner debate putting the family’s unity to challenge.

P.S. Jerusalem offers an intriguing insight on contemporary Jerusalem.

The Second time around (Canada, 2016)

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Press Agent for The second time around asked us kindly (she is always kind) to write about The Second time around (Canada, 2016) and we just can’t refuse anything to her. We promised, at least, to mention the work. And here we go.

A Canadian production (this is no Cronenberg stuff), with a made for TV look and feel, The second time around stars Linda Thorson (of 1960’s The Avengers series fame) and Stuart Margolin.

The second time around is typical feel good material. The story of two senior citizens, in residence, discovering (beginning with a common passion for music) that there is still the possibilities for love (and sex!!!) after 65. You don’t say…  And of course sickness and family problems stick around for melodrama purpose.

Out this Friday March 24th.

The Happiest Day in the Life of Olli Mäki (Finland – 2016)

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for Cinetalk.net

Finnish director Juho Kuosmanen’s first feature, The Happiest Day in the Life of Olli Mäki, won top prize of Cannes Film Festival’ Un certain Regard in 2016. As Finland’s submission to the Academy Awards, it made it to the infamous short list of nine before being cut out when it came down to five. It should have been in.

 

The Happiest Day in the Life of Olli Mäki is based on real events. In 1962 Mäki got a shot at the World Featherweight boxing title becoming the hero of a nation. But on the way, because of love, he partly lost the will to fight.

Kuosmanen’s film, poetically shot in glorious black and white by Continue reading