RIDM 2017: Nowhere to hide (Iraq – 2016)

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Zaradasht Ahmed’s tragic film, Nowhere to hide, follows the tribulations of Nori Sharif, a medic, and his family through five years of war ravaged Central Iraq.

In 2011, the U.S soldiers are pulling out. Various groups, militias and ISIS, want to take over. A new war is on the verge. Ahmed gave Sharif a camera.  A perilous journey begins.  At first, we follow him tracking survivors and victims in a gripping insight into one of the most dangerous part of the world. He is a medic he sees them coming in everyday. And he films. In the middle of herds of sheep, they tell of a peaceful place that became a human hunting ground. And of the absence of real conflicts between tribes in these parts prior to the invasion. At times it sounds like the way natives of the Americas and Africa were treated. Their suffering, the war that is still going on, is now of no interests to the big medias.

Nowhere to hide is filled with fragmented disturbing stories. Corruption, violence, shootings, bombs, sudden disappearances, condemned children becoming Continue reading

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FANTASIA 2017: Liberation Day ( Norway-Latvia, 2016)

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In august 2015, as part of the 70th anniversary of Korea’s independence from Japanese ruling, Slovenian Industrial-rock band Laibach played a gig in Pyongyang, North Korea. Morten Traavik Ugis Olte’s Liberation Day chronicles this surrealist event in an entertaining and comprehensive way, thus being careful not to leave behind viewers who may not be familiar with this iconic group.

Born in Tito’s 1980’s Yugoslavia, Laibach, with its use of provocative iconography (Malevich’s black crosses, military outfits, etc) were dubbed as fascists right from the start. So, 30 years later, when it came to a first time open doors of North Korea to pop-rockin’ concert from Westerners, they seemed like the oddest choice. And they were. But, Continue reading

Focus on Nordic Cinema

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A focus on Nordic Cinema, presented by Cine Tapis Rouge, runs at Cinema Du Parc in Montreal from September 23rd-28. It opens with Aleksi Salmenperä’s Häiriötekijä (Distractions, Finland, 2015) made of multiple aesthetic short tales of the bizarre with no real link between them except for the actors playing several roles.

Also showing, Jörn Donner’s Armi elää! (Armi alive!, Finland, 2015) a film about the woman behind the Finnish design company Marimekko. Starting in a documentary style, it takes advantage of its budget limitation by constructing its portrayal of Armi Ratiaa by incorporating it in an in progress theater adaptation instead of going for the costly usual reconstitution. It interestingly questions the vision of a character in such biopic enterprises.

Horror fans have an appointment with WW2 German soldiers and their Norwegian prisoner confronted to a House of Exorcism in Reinert Kiil’s THE HOUSE (Huset, Norway). Same goes for Punk music fans with the showing of renown Swedish filmmaker Lukas Moodysson’s WE ARE THE BEST.

Icelandic director Rúnar Rúnarsson’s Þrestir (Sparrows)a beautifully crafted adolescent drama set in Iceland’s breathtaking landscape will close the festival on Wednesday, 9PM at Parc.

Schedules:

http://www.cinemaduparc.com/english/affichee23sept.php?id=focus2016#top

FANTASIA 2016: A CONSPIRACY OF FAITH (DEN/GER/SWE/NOR- Hans Peter Molland)

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A note in a bottle is found  in Scotland which has traveled across the ocean for a long time. The note is hard to decipher, but when the Danish inspectors from Section Q get it, the investigation is brought to life…

Hans Peter Molland’s adaptation of this third installment in crime writer’s  Jussi Adler-Olsen  Department Q series  (following The Keeper of Lost Causes and The Absent One )  is the most appealing of the trilogy. Detectives Carl Morck and Assad (played by Nikolaj Lie Kaas and Fares Fares) are once again leading the investigation about Continue reading

5 (MORE) NORWEGIAN GENRE FILMS

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Burning 

(Børning, Hallvard Bræin, 2014) – Action, comedy

A down-on-his-luck wanna-be car racer is challenged in a illegal race through the length of Norway.

This light, but enjoyable, action comedy is a tribute to the cinema of American director/ stunt coordinator Hal Needham (of Smokey and the Bandit and Cannonball Run fame),  Old-fashioned-style with some roaring roaring speed cars  and colorful characters. This a an entertainment bumpy ride throughout the Norwegian landscape.

 

Cold Prey 

(Fritt Vilt, Roar Uthaug, 2006) – Horror

After a snowboarding accident, five friends are forced to take shelter in an abandoned hotel in the mountains of Jotunheimen.

Almost ten years before The Wave, Roar Uthaug made thischilling film debut with this original take on the slasher/survival Continue reading