Bubble Heads – A prequel…

Our beloved discovery at Fantasia 2017…

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We received a call from the production team behind the amazing Japanese stop motion feature, Junk Head, one of the best films of the year. And a (Mostly) independent affair.

They are in the process of funding a prequel with Kickstarter involved and they need YOU.

So take time to read back our review: https://cinetalk.net/2017/07/24/fantasia-2017-junk-head-japan-2017/

AND

Their Kickstarter Link (worth your time, these guys are hot!):

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/595518883/bubble-heads

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Fantasia 2017: Cinetalk’s Final Cut

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for Cinetalk.net

We’re reaching final stage at Fantasia 2017.

There is still much to see if you want to catch up within the next days. It ends on August 2, the closing film being South Korea’s A Taxi driver. The same day (at 6:30) don’t miss the 4K restoration (supervised by legendary cinematographer Luciano Tovoli) of Dario Argento’s seminal horror film, Suspiria (1977). Note that the programming team added a special showing, the North American Premiere of Takashi Miike’s Samurai fantasy Blade of the Immortal (July 31st).

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Then, our final statement (some of the films we reviewed still showing) …

While she mostly went for Japan, Daria’s round up of favorites includes Cocolors for its digital animation imitating traditional Japanese woodblock printing with great layered background artwork, plus a heartwarming ending (playing this afternoon of July 29, 4:15 PM). Her short review, here:  https://cinetalk.net/2017/07/28/fantasia-2017-cocolors-japan-2017/

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With Rage (also playing tonight at 8:30PM), Daria noted the Continue reading

Fantasia 2017: Spoor (Poland – 2017)

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for Cinetalk.net

Director Agnieszka Holland learned her trade with Krzysztof Zanussi and Andrzej Wajda. The Polish director is a three times Oscar Nominee, for Angry Harvest, In Darkness (both in the Best foreign language film category)and Europa, Europa (Best screenplay category, 1990).

Spoor, Holland’s new film (co-directed by, Kasia Adamik, her daughter)is based upon the book by Olga Tokarczuk.

A strange series of killings occur in Poland’s beautiful Kłodzko Valley (Near Czech Republic border). Animal rights activist Janina (played by Agnieszka Mandat) regularly confronts the local corrupted power (which share link with poachers) and befriend the outcasts of the village. Soon, poachers and officials are dying, one after another, and she tries to convince authorities it is animal vengeance. Could it be that she is right? Continue reading

Fantasia 2017: Cocolors (Japan, 2017)

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for Cinetalk.net

Blind faith in the reality of an outside world pushes Cocolors’ protagonists ahead in a mission to see what they’ve been told that they cannot. Toshihisa Yokoshima’s animated gem constructs a dystopia where children still act like kids despite their full-body protective gear, and the frailness their society’s inhabitants have inherited. Living underground after a natural disaster, Aki tries to bring hope to himself and everyone around him, but his words fall flat. His friend, Fuyu (re)invents the traditional Japanese art of woodblock printing. He is missing just one special ink color to complete his piece. Alas, it only exists “out there”.

Fatalism is pit against naive optimism in a toon shaded digital animation world (toon shading creates flat color areas – similar to woodblock printing techniques – instead of rendering objects with 3D volume). Set to a lovely score by Abe Ryudai and Hirose Kiyoshi, Cocolors premiered in Japan as a multimedia performance where Continue reading

Fantasia 2017: Rage (Lee Sang-il, 2016)

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DARIA GAMLIEL for Cinetalk.net

Without knowing in advance about the premise or plot, Rage throws at-first disjointed events and characters at the viewer. The connections slowly unfurl with a manhunt revealing three possible identities of a murderer. If however, the viewer goes into this 142-minute drama cum suspense thriller with the notion that it is a horror film, this isn’t the case. Perhaps by design, the mis-typing of Lee Sang-il’s film gives it the advantage of surprising its audience. It is Shunji Iwai-esque in its epic-length and treatment of subject matter. It follows multiple characters – misfits – whose confusion and grief propel their coming-of-age. Scenic Okinawan locations are juxtaposed against the neons of Tokyo, and the viewer is drawn into the relation between characters and environment.

Rarely seen in Japanese film, the gay community is surprisingly well showcased. Rage tackles several still-taboo subjects in this area, such as online hookups, what constitutes a ‘family’, and how to deal with chosen-family burial. The exchanges between characters in this story arc are Continue reading