Ciao Luis Bacalov! (1933-2017) – Django Composer.

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Academy Award winner (1996 Best original score for Il Postino) Luis Bacalov died on November 15. The Argentinian-born Maestro had a prolific film scoring career in Italy spanning seven decades.  Also being nominated to an Oscar for the music of Pasolini’s The Gospel according to St-Matthew (1964) he was also praised for such film music as Fellini’s City of Women (1980).

But this talented pianist, also active in the Italian progressive music scene, definitely left a mark with his opening song and score to Sergio Corbucci’s Cult classic Django (1966), that same song and score Quentin Tarantino used in Django unchained (It is impressive how many people Continue reading

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John Carpenter’s Anthology Tour – Montreal – Nov. 13. Mtelus – Review

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John Carpenter, the mastermind behind horror and Sci-fi classics such as Halloween (1978), The Thing (1982) and Prince of Darkness (1987) is on tour. The Cult director/ soundtrack Composer is recognized as this famous director who’s scoring his pictures himself. So he is touring to play some music.

From 1974’s Dark Star, his feature debut, to 2001’s Ghost of Mars, Carpenter composed the music to all his theatrical movies (the 1970’s and 80’s soundtracks were produced in association with Alan Howarth) except for Starman (1984, music by Jack Nitzsche) and The Thing (1982, Music by Ennio Morricone with partial overdubs by Carpenter and Howarth).

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In the Live version, things start roundly with a pretty good rendering of the theme to Carpenter’s Sci-fi Adventure, Escape from NY (1981), one of his best. Accompanied by a quintet, with his son Cody,  also on keyboards just like dad,  the director leads the show (his gear is set at the front) with a quiet but strong presence. A little technical snag?  No problems, he’ll talk to the audience like they are old buddies. They were already captured anyway. When the first notes of the theme to Continue reading

Goblin: Live – Montreal, October 27th, 2017

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On October 27th, at Fairmount Theatre, Italian horror movie soundtrack heroes, Goblin paid a second visit to our fair city of Montreal, (if we do not take into account original member Claudio Simonetti’s own tour) and they entertained, once more, an attentive crowd.

Since the 1970s the band has changed personnel, dissolved, and reformed multiple times. This time Montreal was lucky to receive an (almost complete) original lineup, including Massimo Morante (guitar), Agostino Marangolo (drums), Maurizio Guarini (keyboards), Fabio Pignatelli (bass), and Aidan Zammit (keyboards). Core member Claudio Simonetti was still absent…

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Fitting for a Halloween weekend, the show opened with the sound of a scary scream. Accompanied by looped horror film footage on the screen behind them, the quintet kicked things off with Killer on a Train (from Dario Argento’s Non Ho Sonno, 2001). A string of newer songs, including Continue reading

FNC 2017: Kwaidan – Cine Concert

 

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Imagine you are in a museum looking at a Picasso and suddenly some kid Tags it with spray paint all over.

Well it is exactly what a group of musicians did this Thursday, under the direction of composer Sarah Pagé, to Masaki Kobayashi’s visually striking Kwaidan (1964), originally scored by legendary Toru Takemitsu.

Takemitsu’s soundtrack, ranked # 16 in Rolling Stone Magazine list of Greatest Horror Soundtracks, gave the John Cage treatment of theories and paradigm-shifting sounds to Kobayashi’s collection of ghost stories from the Japanese folklore, distorting traditional instruments and other ingenious devices, carefully balancing sound and silence.

In Music for Movies (1994), the composer explained, about the Continue reading

Fantasia 2017 : The MAN WHO LAUGHS – the Gabriel Thibaudeau Score

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Concert time at Fantasia tonight!

German film maker Paul Leni shot Victor Hugo’s The Man who Laughs (1928), starring Conrad Veidt (WAXWORKS,THE CABINET OF DR. CALIGARI), in America. Seventy years later, this silent classic had a score commissioned to amazingly gifted specialist of the genre (live accompaniment for live silent films that is), Gabriel Thibaudeau that premiered at the Cannes Film Festival in 1998.

While the first incarnations for concert Hall purpose were performed by the Octuor de France, under the direction of Maestro Thibaudeau, a nine-piece orchestra (featuring the exquisite Quatuor Molinari), under the direction of the composer, will be on duty tonight.

Don’t miss this Gem!

July 20 • 8:00 PM Théâtre D.B. Clarke